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Brother Dege with Adam Faucett

July 14 @ 7:00 pm - 11:30 pm

$15.00 – $20.00
Brother Dege

The Last Concert Cafe Presents:
Brothers Dege with Adam Faucett
Houston, TX at Last Concert Cafe
Thursday, July 14th, 2022

TICKETS 🎟️: On-sale Monday, June 13th 9AM CST
DOORS🚪: 7:00 PM
SHOWTIME 🎶: 8:00 PM


More on Brothers Dege:
Grammy-nominated Brother Dege Legg (Quentin Tarantino’s Django Unchained) is one of the best-kept secrets in Louisiana; a musician, writer (Louisiana Press Award 2004, 2008), outsider artist, and heir to a long line of enigmatic characters birthed in slaughterhouse of the Deep South. It’s a been a wild ride for this boy. Like the mad love child of Son House and William Faulkner, Legg has burned a colorful trail through the Promised Land, working odd jobs (dishwasher, day laborer, cabdriver, embedded journalist, homeless shelter employee), hitchhiking, studying philosophy, and writing books while passionately championing the swampy quirks of Deep South.
Growing up, there were few promising opportunities for young man of Legg’s eccentric stripe in Cajun country and things eventually got difficult and strange: chronic bouts of depression, habitual drug use, clashes with local pecking orders and prejudices, and arrests soon became routine. During one gloomy episode – deflated and broke – Legg climbed the Mississippi River Bridge in Baton Rouge, determined to dive into the next life, but after a last minute change of heart, he humbly climbed back down and vowed to find a better way to exist. He immediately drove himself to rehab in a stolen Camaro and rededicated himself to creative pursuits, namely songwriting and writing. He soon formed the rock band Santeria who had a 10-year run of chaos and bedeviled kookiness (1994-2004). After four albums, they disbanded in an anarchic heap of bad luck, poverty, exhaustion, and voodoo curses they suspected were cast on the band to hasten their demise.
Legg spent the next year living in low-rent motels and trailer parks, writing new songs that tapped into the haunting style of the Delta Blues greats. With an odd ease, the songs poured out, spitting new life into the genre, not by hackneyed imitation, but by infusing original Delta-slide songs with his own experience of growing up in the Deep South—young, white, alienated, and lost. Legg’s Robert Johnson-on-Thorazine-style slide work paired with his droning-rural psychedelia brought the backwoods sounds of Louisiana (hurricanes, cows, cicadas) to life while remaining firmly rooted in the troubled and death-obsessed masters. This batch of songs became the first Brother Dege release, the now critically-acclaimed Folk Songs of the American Longhair (2010) – a record that Quentin Tarantino later referred to as “almost like a greatest hits album” of new Delta blues.
Home-recorded in Alan Lomax-like austerity, the album delivered postmodern tales of desperate southerners, apocalyptic prophecies, midnight angels, hippie drifters, burning barns, and the endless ghosts that haunt the history the Deep South. Quietly self-released with no distribution, no representation, and absolutely no hype, Folk Song of the American Longhair quickly earned 4-star reviews (UNCUT) and gained the attention of numerous tastemakers in film and TV, scoring sync placements on Discovery Channel’s After the Catch, Nat Geo’s Hard Riders, women’s cycling documentary Half the Road, Netflix’s The Afflicted, and most notably hand-picked by Quentin Tarantino for inclusion in the movie and soundtrack to Django Unchained.
Brother Dege quickly expanded his cinematic vision of the South with two follow-up albums: How to Kill a Horse (2013) and Scorched Earth Policy (2015). Teaming with otherworldly slide guitars, country psych, barn burning anthems, the tradition continues with his latest release Farmer’s Almanac (2018), a sprawling, southern concept album that further explores the unique mysteries of small towns.
Brother Dege’s latest album is the critically acclaimed Farmer’s Almanac, an 11-track, southern gothic journey that explores escapism, class structure, and the opiated dark side of America’s small town rural communities. Brother Dege’s fourth album swarms with otherworldly slide guitars, rustic psychedelia, possessed barn burners, and swamp-drenched cinematic songcraft.
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More on Adam Faucett:
Hailing from Little Rock, Arkansas, and possessing a voice the Onion A.V. Club warns “knocks your brain into the back of your skull,” Adam Faucett has drawn comparisons from Tim Buckley to Cat Power to Otis Redding.
Called “one of the greatest, most thoughtful lyricists the state has to offer,” (Arkansas Times) Faucett has again pushed the borders of his “part folk, part blues, part elemental rock stomp, part unidentifiable cosmic holler” (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette) with the release of It Took the Shape of a Bird, a record of his most personal, unbodied, and darkly beautiful songs to date.
Faucett began performing solo in 2006 when the demise of Russellville, Arkansas-based band, Taught the Rabbits, pushed him toward Chicago. He returned to Arkansas in 2007 to record his first solo album, The Great Basking Shark, and began touring nationally. 2008’s Show Me Magic, Show Me Out followed, featuring Faucett’s band, The Tall Grass, and a relentless tour schedule soon led to shows with Jason Isbell, Damien Jurado and Lucero.
2011 saw the release of More Like A Temple, which received praise from outlets including American Songwriter, Paste Magazine, No Depression and Uprooted Music Review. Temple also gained overseas support, landing at #14 on the EuroAmericana chart and received 5 stars from Altcountry.NL, bringing Adam to Europe for the first time.
2014’s Blind Water Finds Blind Water—Faucett’s first release with Last Chance Records—was named to American Songwriter’s “Top 50 Albums of 2014,” and found him back in Europe. In addition, he spent time as international and national tour support for Chuck Ragan, Austin Lucas, King Buzzo, The Bottle Rockets and Pallbearer.
Faucett’s latest record, It Took the Shape of a Bird (Last Chance Records), is available on all platforms and was named to Pop Matters’ “Top 20 Americana Albums of 2018. His fifth solo album, it’s also his most personal and heaviest. From opening track “King Snake,” it wastes no time immersing the listener into a world of murky storytelling fueled by true, though often skewed accounts, wherein Faucett’s moving, heartrending melodies breathe life into a cast of tragic and historic characters and locales: a World War II-era orphan, Louisiana gris gris girls, a biker’s funeral procession, a friend struggling with faith and addiction, and even the Mackay Bennett—the ship which recovered most of the bodies from the Titanic disaster.
Bird delves deep into the spiritual and examines the creation of art, and the artist. Its backdrops are disparate, ranging from rural Arkansas to the dust clouds of deep space. And its moments of lilt are bolder due to its darker turns.
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Address: 1403 Nance St, Houston, TX 77002
www.lastconcert.com
Phone: (713) 226-8563

Tickets

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$ 15.00
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Details

Date:
July 14
Time:
7:00 pm - 11:30 pm
Cost:
$15.00 – $20.00
Event Tags:
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Venue

Last Concert Cafe
1403 Nance St.
Houston, TX 77002 United States
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Phone:
713 226-8563
View Venue Website

Organizer

Last Concert Cafe
Phone:
678-899-1323
Email:
andrew@lastconcert.com
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Other

Doors
7 PM
Music
8 PM
RSVP Link
https://www.facebook.com/events/589927965733649